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the death of pop-fifths-artwork

This week The Death of Pop release their jangly five track collection ‘Fifths’ on the heels of the lead singles ‘Whenever‘ and ‘Mirage‘ (which are bound to wear out some grooves). The London team (three brothers and two cousins) make music that has a lush, textured quality. Building gazey walls of summery, brightly compressed guitars and dreamy, echoing vocals – a family of psych-loving songwriters!

The opening half highlights the best of the band – booming and brilliant, with layers of jangling guitars dancing between infectiously twangy bridges. The vocals are clear and lovely throughout the tracks, somehow distinctly English, at times reminding me of The Stone Roses given a heavy ‘chorus’ treatment. The tracks are tight and fresh, bound to hook listeners in by the time ‘Mirage’ hits. It melts energetically into a droning psychedelic sea that breaks with the delightfully bare acoustic opening of the lovable ‘Key of Three.’ It’s a sweet change of pace that hints at the groups vocal and tune writing talents.

There’s a bit of a timeless quality to The Death of Pop’s fabulous new EP. There’s also a disparate nature to the collection, as if the band set out in a jangle time-machine. The jumpy transition during ‘Key of Three’, for example, is jarring enough to make one speculate which of the brothers (or was it a cousin?) switched reels while making the master. It’s fun, as is the chill, synth-laden closer ‘Circles’ but it’ll throw some listeners for a loop. It’s imaginative and daring, if uneven. There’s a lot to love in each song, and when Death of Pop hits their stride, they make waves. [By Dave Lytton]

Check out Death of Pop @ Facebook @ Bandcamp @ Soundcloud with limited run ‘Fifths’ “flexizine ep” @ Art is Hard Records.

 

 

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