A.R. Kane Return To Stage!?

arkane-singles

An A.R. Kane reunion is imminent! Well, kinda. Rudy Tambala, former member of the British duo announced via Facebook that he will be playing some A.R. Kane classics with some “friends”. So, technically it’s not a reunion. But who cares, those that remember them will be happy, and those that never knew them, will! The pair (reportedly) invented the term “dream-pop” during their eight year lifespan (between 1986 and 1994), releasing three ground breaking albums and numerous singles/EPs via Rough Trade and 4AD. Time to brush up on the classics!

 
A.R. Kane – ‘Complete Singles Collection Album Sampler’

Visit A.R. Kane online @ Facebook.

Bizarre – ‘Vectors’

bizarre-cafe-de-flor

And now for something completely different! Seksound are re-issuing Bizarre’s 1996 tape ‘Cafe De Flor‘ (on digital, and for the first time on vinyl). It’s the second album from the band, who are considered to be one of the first shoegaze bands from Estonia! ‘Vectors’ is just a taste, the rest of the album is quite a trip! A mix of experimental electronica, world music and shoegaze.

 
Bizarre – ‘Vectors’

Visit Bizarre @ Bandcamp @ Seksound.

Ride Go Acoustic For Reunion Show

ride-live-100-club

Loads of footage has emerged online from Ride‘s hour long show at London’s 100 Club, their first in twenty years! The British rock vets opted for an acoustic set which featured ‘Like A Daydream’ and ‘Vapour Trail’ (as below). It was just Mark Gardener and Andy Bell performing, with Steve and Loz sitting out. Rolling Stone posted an interview, while Finnish website Rumba posted some live videos. Ride kick off their (full line-up) shows in the U.S. this April.

 
Ride – ‘Vapour Trail’ [Live Acoustic @ 100 Club, London Feb 2015]

Visit Ride online @ Facebook.

Languis – ‘Other Desert Cities’

languis-Other-Desert-Cities-vinyl

Thanks to the good taste at Shelflife Records, fans of L.A’s Languis can look forward to a limited 10inch reissue of their 2006 EP ‘Other Desert Cities’!  The limited re-release includes a digital bonus track called ‘I Paint’ (recorded during the same sessions). ‘Other Desert Cities’ features founding members Alejandro Cohen and Marcos Chloca, together with Stephen Swesey (Tristeza) and John Girgus (Aberdeen). As the presser states, it’s considered their “post-shoegaze psychedelic masterpiece”. Languis formed back in 1991 but for many, this will be an introduction.  Jump in…

 
Languis – ‘Other Desert Cities’ [EP Stream]

Visit Languis @ Shelflife Records.

Blind Mr. Jones – ‘Tatooine’

blind-mr-jones

Saint Marie Records is celebrating the 20th Anniversary release of Blind Mr. Jones‘ classic album ‘Tatooine’ (on CD and Vinyl). This is the first time the album has been available on wax, now fully remastered with sexy artwork! The British shoegazers drew comparisons to Ride and Slowdive at the time, one of their defining features was the inclusion of a flutist. As Last fm puts it, they were “jokingly referred to as the Jethro Tull of shoegazing for their frequent use of flute”. Jump into the full LP stream below and hit up Saint Marie for a copy!

 
Blind Mr. Jones – ‘Tatooine’ (20th Anniversary Edition Stream)

Visit Blind Mr. Jones @ Saint Marie Records @ Facebook.

Guy Fixsen On Laika’s ‘Silver Apples Of The Moon’ Re-issue

Guy-Fixsen

Medical Records have unveiled their first batch of 2015 releases, among them is the (long out of print) debut from Laika, ‘Silver Apples Of The Moon’ (order here)! The album was originally released in 1994 on the much loved London label Too Pure (former home to Stereolab, PJ Harvey, Seefeel, Electrelane and more). Laika (named after the soviet space dog) was founded by Margaret Fiedler, John Frenett and Guy Fixsen. This week Guy responded to a brief Q&A about the re-issue. For the uninitiated, his production work includes… *deep breath* The Pixies, My Bloody Valentine, Rollerskate Skinny, Slowdive, Chapterhouse, The Boo Radleys and Moose (among many more)!

What creative head space were you in going into Laika’s debut given your previous work with Moonshake?

I think in retrospect we were both out to prove a lot. Margaret as her first outing after a very competitive partnership that came unstuck in a fairly acrimonious fashion and myself as my first project as artist – after having done a lot of production I was kind of straining at the leash to try out all these ideas in my head.

How did you fall upon the combination of live percussion, dreamy vocals and far out electronics? Was it the result of endless jam sessions?

We never jammed as a band, the music was always clearly marked out before it was taken to the band. There was a kind of jamming in the writing process in the sense that we played with our sounds a lot. The percussion and electronics were just two of many elements we liked in music we listened to and we were lucky to find in lou ciccotelli someone who could realise the multi-layered polyrhythmic percussion we wanted. The “far-out electronics” was just a natural result of us playing with our two main toys which were a sampler and a moog. The dreamy vocals bit was just the lovely thing that happened when margaret opened her mouth on some tracks and anyway it’s hardly the rule on the record. Certainly on the second half of the record it’s hard to call the vocals “dreamy”.

‘Sugar Daddy’ is absolute classic! But, was there a moment when you thought “Y’ know, people just aren’t going to get this…”?

There were tracks on the album I thought people might find hard to get but that wasn’t one of them. It has plenty of clear pop hooks, it’s in 4/4 with a strong dance sensibility – what’s not to get?

‘Silver Apples Of The Moon’ was an ambitious, (and somewhat) unclassifiable record. Do you think new listeners twenty years later will find it easier to digest?

Maybe a bit. Some of what we were doing was ahead of its time I guess, but what has not changed is how conservative people are about mixtures. The vast majority of people seem to feel uncomfortable listening to things they can’t clearly define – then as now.

Looking back, how influential do you think the Too Pure artists of the time were (Seefeel, Stereolab etc)?

I often hear little bits of a lot of Too Pure bands filtering through, by circuitous routes, to bands all over the world and musical spectrum who never even heard of the label. Polly has obviously cast a big shadow, there was a time when it seemed that no self-respecting left field female rock artist could cough without it having a little of her dark twang. I think stereolab maybe were more influential in a spiritual way than a direct musical way. A bunch of great artists have told us that they drew inspiration from us. i’m proud, for example, that in radiohead’s most creative period they ran with a few laika-esque threads and did some lovely things with them. But Seefeel? Meh.

**ORDER LAIKA’S “SILVER APPLES OF THE MOON’ COLORED VINYL RE-ISSUE VIA MEDICAL RECORDS**

Visit Laika online @ Medical Records – Web / Facebook / Bandcamp.